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Individual Psychodynamic Psychotherapy

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Individual psychotherapy can serve as a powerful tool for healing, transformation and growth. My therapeutic approach is informed by my clinical training, along with a continued study of, and reverence for, approaches to healing, transformation, and justice that are rooted in a commitment to collective liberation.

Below are the principles and frameworks that guide my clinical work:

1. Relational: 

A relational approach to therapy places a strong emphasis on the therapeutic relationship as a dynamic and collaborative space. 

This exploration of the therapeutic relationship provides insights into how past relational patterns may manifest in the present, and offers an opportunity for being curious about those patterns. A relational approach also means that I am consistently curious about and paying attention to the dynamics within our therapeutic relationship. This involves exploring fears around intimacy and vulnerability, and regularly checking in about the connection's emotional resonance.

2. Psychodynamic: 

A psychodynamic lens appreciates the interconnectedness of our past, present, and future, and supports insight into how our histories shape our relationships with ourselves and others. My graduate training was heavily rooted in a psychodynamic framework, and I draw significantly from relational, feminist and queer psychoanalytic theory.

3. Trauma-Informed: 

A trauma-informed approach prioritizes agency, choice, and consent. 

Rather than pathologizing coping strategies, a trauma-informed approach invites curiosity about the contexts in which those strategies emerged and how they supported you (and continue to support you) in surviving stressful, overwhelming, and threatening situations. A trauma-informed approach means that I reject any frameworks that reify power dynamics and assume that I, as the practitioner, know best. Tangibly, this means that our work is often slow, creating spaciousness for tuning into your body’s signals, and refusing the urgency of oppressive systems and abusive power dynamics that many are coming to therapy to heal from. 

4. Accessibility

​I am interested in supporting our work in being as accessible as possible. This means I welcome feedback and conversation related to access needs, and continuously reflect on how to support you in feeling safe enough to voice your needs. I do not assume that therapy is an intrinsically safe space; instead, I believe safety is a co-created, dynamic process. My commitment to accessibility is also reflected in my decision to work exclusively online due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and its disproportionate impacts on disabled, chronically ill, and BIPOC communities. 

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5. Attachment-Based: 

Attachment theory provides a framework to understanding how our early experiences shape the way we relate to ourselves and others, and offers insight into the impact of inconsistent attunement during childhood.


In therapy, an attachment lens not only sheds light on these early dynamics but also helps us understand how you and I relate to each other, given the intimacy inherent in therapy. This lens invites a compassionate exploration of attachment patterns, fostering a deeper understanding of relational dynamics and their influence on current experiences and connections.

Particularly, it offers insight into the impact of inconsistent attunement during childhood. In therapy, an attachment lens not only sheds light on these early dynamics but also helps us understand how you and I relate to each other, given the intimacy inherent in therapy. This lens invites a compassionate exploration of attachment patterns, fostering a deeper understanding of relational dynamics and their influence on current experiences and connections.


6. Anti-Oppressive: 

Central to an anti-oppressive approach is the acknowledgment that you are the expert of your own experience. While my intersecting identities, knowledge and experience offer perspective, I don’t assume I know your world better than you do. An anti-oppressive approach also situates individual concerns within the larger societal context, fostering an understanding of how systemic forces may contribute to personal challenges, and inviting a collaborative exploration of how the impacts of systemic violence can be navigated and resisted.


7. Somatic: 

To learn more about Somatic Experiencing, please click here.

Many of my clients come to therapy for support in navigating: 

  • Gender, sexuality, and identity exploration 

  • Complex trauma and PTSD 

  • Sexual trauma 

  • Life changes and transitions 

  • Pandemic-related grief and isolation

  • Burnout related to: political organizing, school, caregiving, surviving under capitalism

  • Developmental and early childhood trauma

  • Chronic illness, chronic pain and disability 

  • Polyamory and consensual non-monogamy 

  • Depression, anxiety, and other mood disorders

  • Communication and boundaries 

  • Intergenerational trauma 

 If you are seeking support with any of the concerns or issues listed above, please don’t hesitate to contact me for a free consultation.

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